Afghan and Iranian Human Rights Crises Overlap

Photo by US Army. The region feels the absence of U.S. troops in Afghansitan. Speculation about what comes next.

The U.S. Eyes Seventh Round For Iran Nuclear Talks. 

Today, in Iranian human rights news. 

News Roundups

By Rachel Brooks

July 8, 2021 

On July 7, Kayhan Life, a news outlet for global Iranians, reported that the U.S. was eyeing the seventh round of nuclear talks with the regime. Talks center around “resuming compliance” with the 2015 JCPOA agreement. 

The United States did not confirm when it anticipates these talks. 

“Of course, nothing is certain in the world of diplomacy, but I think we have every expectation that there will be a seventh round of talks at the appropriate moment, at the right time” said U.S. State Department Spokesman Ned Price, quoted by Kayhan Life. 

“Our team looks forward to being engaged in that next round of talks when it does begin.”

Regional Upheaval Overshadowed by Current U.S. Diplomacy Failures

Analysts fear the IRGC will continue taking advantage of American regional diplomacy failures, resulting in increased human rights violations not only for the Iranian public but also their neighbors.

 Kayhan Life likewise analyzed Iran’s attraction to Afghanistan after the withdrawal of the American forces. With Afghanistan facing a repeat crisis with the Taliban, Iran poses to exploit the situation, the news outlet wrote. 

Locals report cities falling to the Taliban with “little to no resistance.” Takeovers happen even in towns where the Afghan government has a presence. Local analysts believe it is the work of inside agents. 

The Afghan government braces for political turmoil as the situation worsens. Asadullah Khalid, head of the National Directorate of Security, and Lieutenant-General Yasin Zia, the Army Chief of Staff, were fired in late June. 

Kayhan Life analyzed reports that Iran had deployed forces to its border with Afghanistan. As of this analysis, the IRGC made no official claims or announcements. Video footage obtained from social media featuring IRGC forces at the scene served as a basis for analysis.

The outlet speculated on IRGC motives in Afghanistan, calling the nation a “pariah state.” The analysts wonder if Iran sees the Taliban as a threat or an opportunity to forward regime agendas.

The rise of Ebrahim Raisi to the presidency suggests the IRGC sees the Taliban as an extraterritorial opportunity. Raisi is a hardliner. His iron fist will close around the branches of the Iranian government. The offensive of regime leaders will spread beyond Iran’s borders, analysts mused.

Recent BBC reports enforce this analysis. The BBC states that Europe warns Iran against its increasing production of enriched uranium. On July 7, the BBC noted that Iran launched enriched uranium production. Iran informed the International Atomic Energy Agency that this uranium is for a research reactor.

The British news outlet suggests Iran increased production after Donald Trump left the JCPOA and imposed sanctions. Foreign entities attribute new aggression from Iran as the result of American policy failures. Incumbent American president Joe Biden wishes to rejoin the agreement. Both the Americans and the Iranian regime state that the other side must make the first move.

The British news outlet suggests Iran increased production after Donald Trump left the JCPOA and imposed sanctions. Foreign entities attribute new aggression from Iran as the result of American policy failures. Incumbent American president Joe Biden wishes to rejoin the agreement. Both the Americans and the Iranian regime state that the other side must make the first move. Foreign entities believe that the deal will stall Iran from producing more uranium. 

Regime opposition argues that Iran is playing a long game with the West. The game is deception. Iran has devised, for a long time, uses for a post-American Afghanistan, Kayhan News analyzes. These plans have continued despite western assumptions about its regional diplomacy. The outlet notes that Taliban members traveled to Tehran in January and held talks with the Iranian foreign minister. 

Regime opposition argues that Iran is playing a long game with the West. The game is deception. Iran has devised, for a long time, uses for a post-American Afghanistan, Kayhan News analyzes. The regime motives in Afghanistan mirror those it enacted in Iraq in 2003. Before Iraq fell to regime instigations, the Taliban and Al Qaeda enforced the regime’s regional will Kayhan News writes. 

Attacks Against U.S. Forces In Iraq

The regime’s Afghanistan agenda is not the only security concern developing under a new Raisi presidency. Task & Purpose writes that American forces present in Iraq have come under fire every day this week, as of July 7. A rocket attack struck the Al-Asad airbase on Wednesday. It was not clear at the time who was responsible for the strike. 

Analyst Seth Frantzman posted a map of drone and rocket attacks to Twitter. The map dates back to June 9 and monitors activity for one month. Frantzman’s map is consistent with reports by Nafiseh Kohnavard, a BBC correspondent, who reported attacks near Al-Asad as early as June 6. Other attack sites include the U.S. Embassy, Balad Oil Base, Baghdad Airport, Erbil bases, and the Omar Oil Field in Syria. 

Frantzman and Kohnavarad’s work is consistent with reports by Republic Underground contributor Ahmad Al Jabbouri, who monitors the resurgence of mujaheddin militias in Iraq. 

Instability in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Syria gives the Iranian regime hardliners new agenda opportunities. Failures to recognize the regime hardliner’s intents in Western policy may likewise give them a straight path to execute these goals. The West reflects its political infighting crisis by pointing fingers across partisan lines. In the meantime, the region surrounding the regime braces for transmission of tyranny’s disease.